Apod nasa

apod nasa

Are APOD images copyrighted by NASA?

The images are sometimes authored by people or organizations outside NASA, and therefore APOD images are often copyrighted, unlike many other NASA image galleries. When APOD began it received only 14 page views on its first day. As of 2012 it had received over a billion image views. APOD is also translated into 21 languages daily.

What are the images in the APOD?

The images are either visible spectrum photographs, images taken at non-visible wavelengths and displayed in false color, video footage, animations, artists conceptions, or micrographs that relate to space or cosmology. Past images are stored in the APOD Archive, with the first image appearing on June 16, 1995.

How many views did APOD get on its first day?

When APOD began it received only 14 page views on its first day. As of 2012 it had received over a billion image views. APOD is also translated into 21 languages daily. APOD was presented at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society in 1996. Its practice of using hypertext was analyzed in a paper in 2000.

What are the APOD dates for 2013 and 2020?

^ APOD: 2013 September 29 - The Fairy of Eagle Nebula. apod.nasa.gov. Retrieved 2019-07-18. ^ APOD: 2020 August 9 - the Origin of Elements.

What NASA content is not subject to copyright?

NASA content - images, audio, video, and computer files used in the rendition of 3-dimensional models, such as texture maps and polygon data in any format - generally are not subject to copyright in the United States.

Can I use APOD Pictures in my classroom?

Q8: Can I use APOD pictures in my classroom? A8: For non-commercial fair use, yes. Please note that many APOD images have are copyrighted and so to use them commercially you must gain explicit permission from the copyright owners. Many times, these copyright owners can be found by following the links provided under the APOD image (s).

What is APODs policy on composited images?

Thanks! Ethics statement: APOD accepts composited or digitally manipulated images, but requires them to be identified as such and to have the techniques used described in a straightforward, honest and complete way. NASA Official: Phil Newman. Specific rights apply.

How do I submit my picture to APOD?

The best way to show us your picture is to load it onto a web page and send us the URL. Please note that by submitting your image to APOD, you are consenting for your image to be used on APOD in all of its forms, including mirror sites, foreign language mirror sites, and direct APOD derivative products.

Q5: I have a picture that would make a good APOD. Will you use it? A5: We cant promise to use it but we do strongly encourage picture submissions to APOD. Even if you only know of a good picture, please tell us about it. If you own the copyright for a submitted picture, please grant us explicit permission to use it.

What does APOD stand for?

A1: APOD stands for the Astronomy Picture of the Day. We abbreviate this as APOD instead of ApotD because APOD sounds better (spoken: AYE-pod). Q2: How can I easily see yesterdays APOD? A2: Click the < less than sign < at the left of todays APOD link line (near the bottom of the daily page). Q3: How can I see an APOD that ran long ago?

What is the name of the APOD book series?

A11: Selections from APODs daily pages have been compiled into two books titled Universe: 365 Days (May 1, 2003) and Astronomy: 365 Days (October 1, 2006) - Publisher: Harry N Abrams. Q12: Is APOD available as a CD?

How many views did APOD get on its first day?

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